Free Supermarket Accident Claim Assessment Free Supermarket Accident Claim Assessment

Claim for Falling on Ice in an Supermarket Entrance

I would like to claim for falling on ice in a supermarket entrance. Is it possible to make an injury claim against the supermarket for not having cleared the ice from the entrance?

It may be possible to make a claim for falling on ice in a supermarket entrance, although it is not possible to confirm this without being aware of the circumstances surrounding your accident. The main issue with claiming injury compensation for a fall on ice in a entrance is whether the presence of ice constituted a failure in the duty of care owed to you by the supermarket.

Wet floor in supermarket

Wet floor in supermarket

Under the Occupier Liability Act (1954), a supermarket is legally obliged to ensure the store — and the grounds — are safe, which includes removing hazards that could easily cause a customer to slip and fall. This duty of care can extend to clearing ice from major thoroughfares. However, the duty of care owed to customers is not absolute and the store manager is not bound to remove all hazards and totally eliminate the risk of a customer slipping and falling. The duty of care only requires the store manager to make the entrance to the supermarket ‘reasonably’ safe. Even though you slipped and fell on ice outside Asda or Tesco or Booths, it does not necessarily mean that a claim for compensation for a fall on ice in an Asda or Tesco or Booths entrance will be possible.

Before a claim for a slip and fall on ice in a supermarket entrance can be made, it must first be established that a duty of care has been breached, and the supermarket manager was negligent (under the circumstances) for failing to take sufficient actions to clear the ice from the supermarket entrance. The supermarket managers of the major supermarket chains like Sainsburys, Tesco, Aldi, etc are all well trained in their responsibilities regarding the safety of their customers.

Due to the fact that all customers must use the entrance to access the store, clearing snow and ice from this area of the supermarket grounds should have been a priority. If clearing the snow from the front of the store — or gritting- would have made the entrance more dangerous, it would not be negligence for failing to make an attempt to clear snow and ice. If an attempt was made to clear snow and ice from the front of the store which made the shop front more slippery than if no action had been taken, it is likely that this would be classed as a failure in a duty of care and negligence.

To find out if your accident resulted from negligence, it is recommended that you speak with a personal injury solicitor about your case. You should explain how you slipped and fell on ice outside Asda, the weather conditions at the time and if any attempt had been made to remove ice from the entrance to the store. A solicitor should then be able to give you an indication as to whether a claim will be possible, although this will only be confirmed after your case has been fully investigated. Evidence of negligence must also be collected to substantiate your claim for falling on ice in an Asda or Marks and Spencers or Waitrose supermarket entrance and a solicitor will do this for you. Evidence is easiest to collect soon after the accident, so it is important that you allow a solicitor to investigate your claim for compensation for a fall on ice in an supermarket entrance as soon as possible.